Dairy Consumption: Higher Rates of Mortality, Cancers, Bone Fractures, Parkinsons, Inflammation, Infertility & Hormone-related Diseases?

Does Dairy Milk Consumption Increase Your Risk of Developing Cancers*, Osteoporosis Bone Fractures, Parkinsons Disease & Earlier Death? This page has excerpts & links to numerous studies in science medical health journals & news media that report the associations of drinking cow’s milk & eating cheese with higher rates of those diseases & mortality. (* Cancer types include prostate, breast, testicular, ovarian).

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High Milk Intake Associated with Higher Mortality and Fracture Incidences:

From a 2014 British Medical Journal (BMJ) study titled: “Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies” – summary excerpts: “Objective: To examine whether high milk consumption is associated with mortality and fractures in women and men… Participants: Two large Swedish cohorts, one with 61,433 women… and one with 45,339 men… Conclusions: High milk intake was associated with higher mortality in one cohort of women and in another cohort of men, and with higher fracture incidence in women…”
Reference: BMJ 2014;349:g6015 – http://www.bmj.com/content/349/bmj.g6015

A related report in the Telegraph newspaper: “Three glasses of milk a day can lead to early death, warn scientists. Drinking three glasses of milk doubles the risk of early death and does not prevent broken bones, new research has shown…
A study that tracked 61,000 women and 45,000 men for 20 years found there was no reduction in broken bones for those who consumed the most milk…” – http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11193329/Three-glasses-of-milk-a-day-can-lead-to-early-death-warn-scientists.html

Related article by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: “Increasing dietary calcium does not prevent bone fractures, according to two meta-analyses published in the British Medical Journal… An additional editorial called for more research to de-emphasize high intakes of calcium without the evidence to support them. The author recommends health organizations reconsider the evidence to produce more practical guidelines free from marketing bias and that minimize side effects.”
From article titled “Increased Dietary Calcium Intake Not Linked to Fracture Prevention”, October 1, 2015 – http://www.pcrm.org/health/medNews/increased-calcium-not-linked-to-fracture-prevention

Related 2014 BBC report: “High milk diet ‘may not cut risk of bone fractures”
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-29805374

Science Quotes Facts health disease problems risks dangers drinking eating cow dairy cow's milk consumption studies show more higher increased osteoporosis bone fractures weak broken bones shorter life mortality humans people sick ill diseased reports study

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 A 1994 study in the American Journal of Epidemiology found likewise that: “Consumption of dairy products, particularly at age 20 years, was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in old age…”
Regards the study the “objective of this population-based case-control study was to identify risk factors for hip fracture among elderly women and men, particularly factors during young and middle adult life.
The study base comprised people aged 65 years and over living in a defined region in Sydney, Australia, during 1990-1991. Cases were recruited from 12 hospitals, and controls were selected using an area probability sampling method, with additional sampling from nursing homes… ”
Reference: “Case-control study of risk factors for hip fractures in the elderly”, Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Mar 1;139:493-505. – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8154473

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Dairy Consumption Associated with Highest Rates of Bone Fractures:

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: “in a 12-year Harvard study of 78,000 women, those who drank milk three times a day actually broke more bones than women who rarely drank milk. [1] Similarly, a 1994 study of elderly men and women in Sydney, Australia, showed that higher dairy product consumption was associated with increased fracture risk. Those with the highest dairy product consumption had approximately double the risk of hip fracture compared to those with the lowest consumption. [2]…”
From an article titled “Calcium and Strong Bones” – http://www.pcrm.org/health/health-topics/calcium-and-strong-bones

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Milk Consumption during Teenage Years Associated with a Higher Rate of Hip Fractures in Men:

From a 2014 study titled “Milk Consumption During Teenage Years and Risk of Hip Fractures in Older Adults” published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics – “Results: … After controlling for known risk factors and current milk consumption, each additional glass of milk per day during teenage years was associated with a significant 9% higher risk of hip fracture in men… Teenage milk consumption was not associated with hip fractures in women…”
More regards the study: “Objectives: To determine whether milk consumption during teenage years influences risk of hip fracture in older adults and to investigate the role of attained height in this association.
Design, Setting, and Participants: Prospective cohort study over 22 years of follow-up in more than 96,000 white postmenopausal women from the Nurses’ Health Study and men aged 50 years and older from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study in the United States.
Conclusions and Relevance: Greater milk consumption during teenage years was not associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in older adults…

Reference: JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(1):54-60. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3821
http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/1769138

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Dr Michael Greger MD clip “Is Milk Good for Our Bones?” is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxnBDDqXSjk Summary: “The galactose in milk may explain why milk consumption is associated with significantly higher risk of hip fractures, cancer, and premature death.” The text transcript is at https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-milk-good-for-our-bones/

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Dr Michael Greger MD article “Does Animal Protein Cause Osteoporosis?” at
https://nutritionfacts.org/2014/07/31/does-animal-protein-cause-osteoporosis/

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Dairy Milk is Not Necessary and is Bad for Human Health?

From a 2014 report in the American Medical Association’s ‘Pediatrics’ journal, by Medical Doctors Ludwig & Willett: “Humans have no nutritional requirement for animal milk… many populations throughout the world today consume little or no milk… bone fracture rates tend to be lower in countries that do not consume milk compared with those that do. Moreover, milk consumption does not protect against fracture in adults, according to recent meta-analysis.”
Reference: “Three Daily Servings of Reduced-Fat Milk. An Evidence-Based Recommendation?”JAMA Pediatr. 2013;167(9):788-789. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.2408
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/article-abstract/1704826

From a related 2014 article in the National Post: “Dr. Walter Willett comes from a long line of dairy farmers, yet he says people are drinking more milk than they need. The Harvard University expert on nutrition says it’s not essential that we have any dairy at all.
“Most of the world does not consume dairy products and (yet) they grow up and become faculty members at Harvard, too,” says Willett…
The Boston Globe has described Willett as “the world’s most influential nutritionist,” a quiet-spoken physician and academic…”
– Reference: http://news.nationalpost.com/appetizer/drinking-milk-not-essential-for-humans-despite-belief-it-prevents-osteoporosis-nutritionist-says

From a 2013 article in The Huffington Post titled “Harvard Milk Study: It Doesn’t Do A Body Good” an excerpt: “humans have no nutritional requirement for milk, and it may be doing us more harm than good because of all the sugar even plain non-fat milk contains, according to a new study by a Harvard professor.
In the paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics, Harvard pediatrician David Ludwig notes that there’s been a lot of research linking sugar-sweetened beverages to obesity, but a surprising lack of data comparing the health effects of reduced-fat milk to whole milk.
Ludwig argues that we should question what we’ve been taught about drinking that recommended three cups a day and that lower-fat milk is really no better than full-fat milk. Low-fat milk, he argues, doesn’t fill you up as much and people end gaining weight by drinking more of it or reaching for that extra chocolate-chip cookie. Though he says the worst culprits, especially for children, are the sweetened varieties like chocolate milk, which of course most kids prefer…”
Reference: http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/07/05/harvard-milk-study_n_3550063.html

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Reports on the Association of Dairy Milk Product Consumption and Higher Rates of Cancer:

From an article titled “Do dairy products cause cancer?” by The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: “Recent scientific studies have suggested that dairy products may be linked to increased risk for prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and possibly for ovarian and breast cancers.
Prostate cancer has been linked to dairy products in several studies. In Harvard’s Physicians Health Study, including more than 20,000 male physicians, those who consumed more than two dairy servings daily had a 34% higher risk of developing prostate cancer than men who consumed little or no dairy products. Several other studies have shown much the same thing…
A recent analysis of studies examining a relationship between dairy product consumption and ovarian cancer risk found that for every 10 grams of lactose consumed (the amount in one glass of milk), ovarian cancer risk increased by 13 percent…”
Reference: http://www.pcrm.org/health/cancer-resources/ask/ask-the-expert-dairy-products

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Dairy Consumption Linked to Increased Rates of Prostate & Testicular Cancer.

In 2015 a meta-analysis of thirty-two studies “on intakes of dairy products and calcium and prostate cancer risk” was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Their findings include: “High intakes of dairy products, milk, low-fat milk, cheese, and total, dietary, and dairy calcium, but not supplemental or nondairy calcium, may increase total prostate cancer risk. The diverging results for types of dairy products and sources of calcium suggest that other components of dairy rather than fat and calcium may increase prostate cancer risk… Supplemental calcium was associated with increased risk of fatal prostate cancer…”
Other notes include: “Prostate cancer is the second most-common cancer in men worldwide with approximately 900,000 new cases diagnosed in 2008 accounting for 13.8% of all cancers in men. Ecologic studies have shown up to a 70-fold variation in the incidence of prostate cancer worldwide with low rates in parts of Asia and Africa and high rates in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and Northern Europe. Migration studies suggested increased risk in Asians who move to the United States, and secular trend studies have reported an increased incidence and mortality within countries over time. These observations suggest a possible influence of modifiable exposures, including diet, on prostate cancer risk…”
Reference: “Dairy products, calcium, and prostate cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies”, Am J Clin Nutr, January 2015, vol. 101 no. 1 87-117; at http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/101/1/87.full

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International Journal of Cancer 2002: “The incidence and mortality rates of testicular and prostatic cancers in 42 countries were correlated with the dietary practices in these countries… Among the food items we examined, cheese was most closely correlated with the incidence of testicular cancer at ages 20-39, followed by animal fats and milk… The results of our study suggest a role of milk and dairy products in the development and growth of testicular and prostatic cancers. The close correlation between cheese and testicular cancer and between milk and prostatic cancer suggests that further mechanistic studies should be undertaken concerning the development of male genital organ cancers.”
Reference: “Incidence and mortality of testicular and prostatic cancers in relation to world dietary practices, Int J Cancer. 2002 Mar 10;98(2):262-7; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11857417#

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A 2001 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition is titled “Dairy products, calcium, and prostate cancer risk in the Physicians’ Health Study“. It states: “We investigated the association between dairy product and calcium intakes and prostate cancer risk in the Physicians’ Health Study, a cohort of male US physicians… During 11 y of follow-up, we documented 1012 incident cases of prostate cancer among 20885 men… RESULTS:… Compared with men consuming < or =150 mg Ca/d from dairy products, men consuming >600 mg/d had a 32% higher risk of prostate cancer… CONCLUSIONS: These results support the hypothesis that dairy products and calcium are associated with a greater risk of prostate cancer.”
Reference: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (Am J Clin Nutr.) 2001 Oct;74(4):549-54. – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11566656

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A 2005 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition is titled “Dairy, calcium, and vitamin D intakes and prostate cancer risk in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Epidemiologic Follow-up Study cohort.”
The authors state: “We examined the association of dairy, calcium, and vitamin D intake with prostate cancer.
DESIGN: In a prospective study of 3612 men followed from 1982-1984 to 1992 for the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Epidemiologic Follow-up Study, 131 prostate cancer cases were identified…
RESULTS: Compared with men in the lowest tertile for dairy food intake, men in the highest tertile had a relative risk (RR) of 2.2 … Low-fat milk was associated with increased risk (RR = 1.5)… Dietary calcium was also strongly associated with increased risk (RR = 2.2)… After adjustment for calcium intake, neither vitamin D nor phosphorus was clearly associated with risk.
CONCLUSIONS: Dairy consumption may increase prostate cancer risk through a calcium-related pathway…”
Reference: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (Am J Clin Nutr.) 2005 May;81(5):1147-54. – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15883441

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A study reported in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2007) concludes “These findings, together with the previous study, suggest that the consumption of milk and dairy products increases the risk of prostate cancer. This is biologically plausible since milk contains considerable amounts of fat, hormones, and calcium that are associated with prostate cancer risk.
Further notes: “We found 18 relevant articles and 13 independent studies were available for our analysis. The summary RR was 1.13 (95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.24) when comparing the highest with the lowest quantile of consumption. The summary RRs by study stratification showed a positive association. A dose-response relationship was identified when combining the studies that partitioned the consumption by quintiles…”
Reference: “Milk consumption is a risk factor for prostate cancer in Western countries: evidence from cohort studies”, Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2007;16(3):467-76; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17704029

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From the Chinese National Journal of Andrology: “Among the food items examined, milk was most closely correlated (r = 0.711) with prostatic cancer incidence, followed by meat and coffee. As for testicular cancer, cheese was most closely correlated (r = 0.804) with the incidences in ages of 20-39, followed by animal fat and milk…”
The study was based on “The incidence rates of testicular and prostatic cancers in 42 countries (regions), collected from the cancer incidence in five continent database (1988-1992), were correlated with the relative food consumption in these countries, which was provided by FAO database…”
Reference: “The effects of estrogen-like products in milk on prostate and testes”, Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue. 2003 Jun;9(3):186-90; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12861831

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An article titled “Milk Consumption and Prostate Cancer” by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine is at
http://www.pcrm.org/health/health-topics/milk-consumption-and-prostate-cancer

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Consuming Cow’s Milk & other Dairy Products Increases Risk of Ovarian Cancer?

Regards cancer of the ovaries the International Journal of Cancer reports: “40% greater risk for women in the highest category of lactose [dairy] consumption compared to the lowest… We observed a 2-fold higher risk of the serous ovarian cancer subtype among those in the highest category of lactose [dairy] consumption compared to the lowest… For each 11-gram increase in lactose consumption (the approximate amount in one glass of milk), we observed a 20% increase in risk of serous cancers… Skim and low-fat milk were the largest contributors to dietary lactose. Women who consumed one or more servings of skim or low-fat milk daily had a 32% higher risk of any ovarian cancerand a 69% higher risk of serous ovarian cancer… compared to women consuming 3 or less servings monthly. Controlling for fat intake did not change our findings…”
Reference: “A prospective study of dietary lactose and ovarian cancer”, International Journal of Cancer, 2004 Jun 10;110(2):271-7; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15069693/

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A 2004 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition declares: “Our data indicate that high intakes of lactose and dairy products, particularly milk, are associated with an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer but not of other subtypes of ovarian cancer.”
Some notes about the study: “We examined the association between intakes of dairy products and lactose and the risk of total epithelial ovarian cancer and its subtypes…
This was a prospective population-based cohort study of 61,084 women aged 38-76 y… After adjustment for potential confounders, women who consumed >/=4 servings of total dairy products/d had a risk of serous ovarian cancer… twice that of women who consumed <2 servings/d… Milk was the dairy product with the strongest positive association with serous ovarian cancer… We observed a positive association between lactose intake and serous ovarian cancer risk…”
Reference: “Milk and lactose intakes and ovarian cancer risk in the Swedish Mammography Cohort”, Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Nov;80(5):1353-7.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15531686

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The summary of a 2006 study in the International Journal of Cancer states: “It has been proposed… that consumption or metabolism of dairy sugar may increase the risk of ovarian cancer… We summarized the available literature on this topic using a meta-analytic approach… Eighteen case-control and 3 prospective cohort studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The findings of case-control studies were heterogeneous… the 3 cohort studies are consistent and show significant positive associations between intakes of total dairy foods, low-fat milk, and lactose and risk of ovarian cancer… In conclusion, prospective cohort studies, but not case-control studies, support the hypothesis that high intakes of dairy foods and lactose may increase the risk of ovarian cancer.
Reference: “Milk, milk products and lactose intake and ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies”. Int J Cancer. 2006;118(2):431-441.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16052536

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A 2016 report concludes: “the meta-analysis findings indicate that high consumption of total, saturated and trans-fats increase ovarian cancer risk…”
It was based on approximately 900,000 subjects from 16 case-control and 9 cohort studies on dietary fat intake.
Specific relevant notes: “High saturated fat intake was associated with a 34% increase in endometroid ovarian cancer risk. The RR [relative risk] for high animal fat intake was 1.36… suggesting a significant positive association [meaning higher incidence rates] between animal fat consumption and mucinous ovarian cancer risk...
Subgroup and sensitivity analysis… Saturated fat (RR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.04-1.39) and dairy fat (RR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.79) intake could increase ovarian cancer risk…”
Reference: “Dietary fat intake and ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies”, Oncotarget. 2016 Jun 14;7(24):37390-37406;at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27119509

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A 1998 report in the Cancer Causes & Control journal states: “Ovarian cancer risk was positively associated with increasing consumption of whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods… These data… suggest that reported associations between milk consumption and ovarian cancer are due to the fat content of milk and not to lactose or galactose.”
Reference: “Milk consumption, galactose metabolism and ovarian cancer (Australia)”, Cancer Causes & Control, 1998 Dec;9(6):637-44; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10189050

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A study reported in the American Journal of Epidemiology “compared ovarian cancer incidence, per capita milk consumption, and population estimates of lactase persistence (the ability to digest lactose after infancy) in 27 countries. Significant positive correlations [meaning higher rates] were noted between ovarian cancer incidence, per capita milk consumption, and lactase persistence…”
Reference: “Lactase persistence and milk consumption as determinants of ovarian cancer risk”, American Journal of Epidemiology, 1989 Nov;130(5):904-10; at
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2510499/

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A 1984 report in the Obstetrics & Gynecology journal states: “Women with ovarian cancer favored foods higher in animal fats and consumed significantly greater amounts of animal fat and significantly less vegetable fat compared with control subjects… there was a significant trend for increasing risk for ovarian cancer with increasing animal fat consumption.”
Reference: “Dietary animal fat in relation to ovarian cancer risk”, Obstetrics & Gynecology, 1984 Jun;63(6):833-8; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6728366/

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Regards Breast Cancer and Consumption of Dairy Milk, Cheese & Yoghurt:

Conclusion from a 2013 report in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute: “Intake of high-fat dairy, but not low-fat dairy, was related to a higher risk of mortality after breast cancer diagnosis.” Some other notes about this study: “Dietary fat in dairy is a source of estrogenic hormones and may be related to worse breast cancer survival… We included 1893 women… diagnosed with early-stage invasive breast cancer… Compared with the reference (0 to <0.5 servings/day), those consuming larger amounts of high-fat dairy had higher breast cancer mortality (0.5 to <1.0 servings/day: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.20… and ≥1.0 servings/day: HR = 1.49…), higher all-cause mortalityand higher non–breast cancer mortality… The higher risk appeared consistent across different types of high-fat dairy products.
Reference: “High- and Low-Fat Dairy Intake, Recurrence, and Mortality After Breast Cancer Diagnosis”, J Natl Cancer Inst., 2013 May 1; 105(9): 616–623.; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3639864/

A related newspaper article:

Daily Mail newspaper (UK) 2013: “Breast cancer patients who eat cheese, yogurts or ice cream could HALVE their chances of survival.
Eating one portion of a product containing full-fat milk each day could hinder survival chances. The hormone oestrogen found in milk and other dairy foods may encourage tumour growth, say researchers. This is the first study to show such a strong link between dairy products and breast cancer
US scientists suspect this is because milk and other dairy foods contain the hormone oestrogen, which encourages tumour growth…
Around one in eight women will develop breast cancer at some point in their lives and there are around 50,000 new cases a year.
Although survival chances are far better than other forms of the illness it still leads to 11,800 deaths annually…
They point out that most milk consumed in Britain and the U.S. comes from pregnant cows and is rich in the hormone oestrogen.
This is known to trigger tumour growth and there are particularly high levels in full-fat dairy foods.
In fact women who ate one portion of full-fat dairy a day were 64 per cent more likely to die from any cause – not just breast cancer…”
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2293426/Breast-cancer-patients-eat-cheese-yogurts-ice-cream-HALVE-chances-survival.html

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A 2015 study published in Breast Care – a peer-reviewed scientific journal – states: “High milk consumption increased the breast cancer risk by 7.2 times… High consumption of cow’s milk was a risk factor for the development of breast cancer.”
Reference: “Association of Milk and Meat Consumption with the Development of Breast Cancer in a Western Mexican Population”, Breast Care (Basel), 2015 Dec;10(6):393-6; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989358

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Video by Cracked.com titled “If Milk Commercials Were Honest – Honest Ads” at
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FM95_k9onEc

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News Report about Avoiding Dairy Products in order to Beat Cancer:

From a 2014 article in the Telegraph newspaper UK titled “Give up dairy products to beat cancer.” Some excerpts: “A leading scientist, who has been fighting breast cancer since 1987, says the disease is overwhelmingly linked to animal products …
“We have all been brought up with the idea that milk is good for you,” says Prof [Jane] Plant. “But there is evidence now that the growth factors and hormones it contains are not just risky for breast cancer, but also other hormone-related cancers, of the prostate, testicles and ovary.”
Going dairy-free, she says, may also help patients with colorectal cancer, lymphoma and throat (but not lung) cancer. “Cows’ milk is good for calves – but not for us,” she adds.
With the relatively new science of epigenetics, scientists now understand that cancer-causing genes may not become active unless particular conditions arise that switch them on – and if those conditions change, they may be switched off. “This means that what you eat can have an impact at the genetic level,” says Prof Plant…
This can happen, say Profs Plant and Djamgoz, because the same growth factors and hormones as we produce are found in food that comes from animals, providing the very “fertiliser” that cancer cells need. Casein, the main protein in cows’ milk, is considered most dangerous. One eminent US nutritional scientist, Prof Colin Campbell at Cornell University, argues that it should be regarded just like oestrogen – as a leading carcinogen.
“Cow’s milk [organic or otherwise] has been shown to contain 35 different hormones and 11 growth factors,” says Prof Plant. High circulating levels of one such growth factor in milk, called IGF-1, is now strongly linked to the development of many cancers. Research has also found that “unbound” IGF levels are lower in vegans than in both meat-eaters and other vegetarians.
This means that a vegan diet is lower in cancer-promoting molecules and higher in the binding proteins that reduce the action of these molecules,” she argues…
For those with cancer or at high risk of the disease, Prof Plant advocates, among other things, cutting out all dairy – from cows, sheep and goats, and whether organic or not. “If you have active cancer, there are no half-measures here.”
She also recommends limiting consumption of other animal protein, such as meat, fish and eggs, replacing this with vegetable protein such as soya – the main source of protein, she points out, in a traditional, rural Chinese diet. But if the evidence that cutting out dairy can successfully “beat cancer” is that strong, why haven’t we been told?
Prof Plant puts it down to vested interests – the dairy industry represents about 12 per cent of Britain’s GDP – and medical conservatism: oncologists, she says, “might be excellent at conventional treatments but are not experts in nutritional biochemistry”. The big cancer charities, for their part, place too much emphasis on drug development. As a result, “if you rely solely on the cancer prevention advice from government, charities, health professionals or the media, you will be missing out on vital and potentially life-saving information.”…
‘Beat Cancer: The 10-Step Plan to Help you Overcome and Prevent Cancer’ by Prof Mustafa Djamgoz and Prof Jane Plant is published by Vermilion…”
Reference: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/healthyeating/10868428/Give-up-dairy-products-to-beat-cancer.html
More information about Professor Plant is available here http://www.cancersupportinternational.com/janeplant.com/index.asp

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Regards the Association of Carcinogenic Viruses in Meat & Dairy Milk and Cancer in Humans:

A 2015 article on the website of the University of Berkeley (USA) is titled “Virus in cattle linked to human breast cancer“. Some excerpts: “A new study by UC Berkeley researchers establishes for the first time a link between infection with the bovine leukemia virus [BLV] and human breast cancer…
They found that 59 percent of breast cancer samples had evidence of exposure to BLV, as determined by the presence of viral DNA. By contrast, 29 percent of the tissue samples from women who never had breast cancer showed exposure to BLV…
The new paper takes the earlier findings a step further by showing a higher likelihood of the presence of BLV in breast cancer tissue. When the data was analyzed statistically, the odds of having breast cancer if BLV were present was 3.1 times greater than if BLV was absent.
This odds ratio is higher than any of the frequently publicized risk factors for breast cancer, such as obesity, alcohol consumption and use of post-menopausal hormones,” said Buehring.
There is precedence for viral origins of cancer. Hepatitis B virus is known to cause liver cancer, and the human papillomavirus can lead to cervical and anal cancers…
The virus could have come through the consumption of unpasteurized milk or undercooked meat, or it could have been transmitted by other humans…
A 2007 U.S. Department of Agriculture survey of bulk milk tanks found that 100 percent of dairy operations with large herds of 500 or more cows tested positive for BLV antibodies. This may not be surprising since milk from one infected cow is mixed in with others. Even dairy operations with small herds of fewer than 100 cows tested positive for BLV 83 percent of the time…”
Reference: http://news.berkeley.edu/2015/09/15/bovine-leukemia-virus-breast-cancer/

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A 2017 report by Dr Michel Greger is titled “The Role of Burger Viruses in Cancer. Polyoma viruses discovered in meat can survive cooking and pasteurization.” The short video clip is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXXygh5hWJA
Some excerpts:
“Nearly 20% of cancer[s]… can be linked to infectious agents,” such as viruses... Polyomaviruses are a particular concern, not only because they are “known to be carcinogenic,” but because they can survive cooking temperatures. Because single burgers these days can contain meat from “many dozens of animals,” they figured it would “present an ideal situation for virus-hunting.” So, researchers at the National Cancer Institute just walked into three supermarkets, and grabbed meat right off the shelf, and found three different polyomaviruses in ground beef…
“Many people are exposed to potentially virus-contaminated meat and dairy products” through their diet, but those in the industry would be even more exposed. So, it would be interesting to see if these groups have higher cancer incidence. And indeed, it now appears clear that those who work “in the meat industry are at increased risk of developing and dying” from a variety of cancers.
Another “reason… to suspect the involvement of [some kind of] bovine infectious factor… in colorectal cancer” is the fact that countries that don’t eat a lot of beef appear to have relatively low rates of colorectal cancer. And, countries that all of a sudden started eating lots of meat had their rates shoot up…”
See the video presentation and transcript at https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-role-of-burger-viruses-in-cancer/

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Regards Adverse Effects of Hormones in Dairy Products including Links to Cancers in Humans:

A 2005 report in science journal Medical Hypotheses stated: “In conclusion, increased consumption of animal-derived food may have adverse effects on the development of hormone-dependent cancers.
More specifically they stated: “The correlation of incidence and mortality rates with environmental variables in worldwide countries provides useful clues to the etiology of cancer. In this study, we correlated incidence rates for breast, ovarian, and corpus uteri cancers… with food intake… in 40 countries. Meat was most closely correlated with the breast cancer incidence (r=0.827), followed by milk (0.817) and cheese (0.751). Stepwise multiple-regression analysis (SMRA) identified meat as the factor contributing most greatly to the incidence of breast cancer ([R]=0.862). Milk was most closely correlated with the incidence of ovarian cancer (r=0.779), followed by animal fats (0.717) and cheese (0.697). SMRA revealed that milk plus cheese make the greatest contribution to the incidence of ovarian cancer ([R]=0.767). Milk was most closely correlated with corpus uteri cancer (r=0.814), followed by cheese (0.787). SMRA revealed that milk plus cheese make the most significant contribution to the incidence of corpus uteri cancer ([R]=0.861)... Among dietary risk factors, we are most concerned with milk and dairy products, because the milk we drink today is produced from pregnant cows, in which estrogen and progesterone levels are markedly elevated.”
Reference: “The possible role of female sex hormones in milk from pregnant cows in the development of breast, ovarian and corpus uteri cancers”, Med Hypotheses,  2005;65(6):1028-37; at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987705003543 and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16125328

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From a 2015 report: “During the last couple of years, increasing body of evidence are indicating another property of hormones in dairy products as possible impact on human health including the role of some estrogens and insulin-like growth factor-1 in initiation and provoking of breast, prostate and endometrial tumours… The collected data from other researchers and our own data are indicating that the presence of steroid hormones in dairy products could be counted as an important risk factor for various cancers in humans.”
Reference: “Hormones in Dairy Foods and Their Impact on Public Health – A Narrative Review Article”, Iranian Journal of Public Health, 2015 Jun; 44(6): 742–758; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4524299/

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Hormones in Milk can be Dangerous” is an article in the Harvard University Gazette. Excerpts: “The link between cancer and dietary hormones – estrogen in particular – has been a source of great concern among scientists… The potential for risk is large. Natural estrogens are up to 100,000 times more potent than their environmental counterparts, such as the estrogen-like compounds in pesticides. “Among the routes of human exposure to estrogens, we are mostly concerned about cow’s milk, which contains considerable amounts of female sex hormones,” Ganmaa told her audience. Dairy, she added, accounts for 60 percent to 80 percent of estrogens consumed…”
Source: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2006/12/hormones-in-milk-can-be-dangerous/

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Dairy Milk and Childhood Obesity

2017 news article: “Obesity warning for parents after study finds toddlers ‘consume four times too much protein on average. Infants aged one need less than 10g of protein per day, but those who took part in the study were consuming 40g on average. Parents have been warned to watch their children’s intake of meat, cheese and milk after researchers linked protein-rich diets to higher levels of body fat
protein from animal sources had the greatest effect on levels of body fat, adding it was not just a case of children being given too much milk, with other protein sources such as cheese, yoghurt, meat and fish all adding up.
Around one in five British 10- and 11-year-olds and nearly one in ten four- and five-year-olds are obese, according to figures from the National Child Measurement Programme…
“Protein from animal sources can trigger the release of insulin and other growth factors, which specifically results in body fat,” she said, adding more research is needed to discern exactly why this effect takes place…”
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/protein-toddlers-consume-four-times-too-much-obesity-body-fat-children-milk-cheese-meat-dairy-a7745566.html

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Dr Michael Greger MD’s 2017 article “How Milk May Contribute to Childhood Obesity
– excerpts: “We’ve known that breastfed infants may be protected against obesity later in life for more than 30 years, but why? It may be the formula. Giving infants formula based on cow’s milk presents an unusual situation. Cow’s milk is designed to put nearly two pounds a day onto a growing calf, 40times the growth rate of human infants (see ‘Formula for Childhood Obesity’).
The perfect food for humans, finely tuned over millions of years, is human breast milk. Remarkably, among all mammalian species, the protein content of human milk is the lowest. The excessive protein content of cow’s milk-based formula is thought to be what sets the child up for obesity later in life…
A study out of Indiana University, for example, found evidence that greater milk intake is associated with an increased risk of premature puberty; girls drinking a lot of milk started to get their periods earlier. Thus, cross-species milk consumption and ingestion into childhood may trigger unintended consequences…
consumption of cow’s milk and other dairy products during adolescence and adulthood is an evolutionarily novel behavior that may have long-term adverse effects on human health.
Teens exposed to dairy proteins, such as casein, skim milk, or whey, experienced a significant increase in BMI and waist circumference compared to a control group. In contrast, not a single study funded by the dairy industry found a result unfavorable to milk…”
Article at https://nutritionfacts.org/2017/03/16/how-milk-may-contribute-to-childhood-obesity/

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Can Dairy Milk Negatively Affect Your Hormones and the Sexual Maturation of Children?

In 2010 Pediatrics International reported a study on how consuming dairy milk alters people’s hormones: “After the intake of cow milk, serum estrone (E1) and progesterone concentrations significantly increased, and serum luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone significantly decreased in men. Urine concentrations of E1, estradiol, estriol and pregnanediol significantly increased in all adults and children. In four out of five women, ovulation occurred during the milk intake, and the timing of ovulation was similar among the three menstrual cycles.”
Their conclusion: “The present data on men and children indicate that estrogens in milk were absorbed, and gonadotropin secretion was suppressed, followed by a decrease in testosterone secretion. Sexual maturation of prepubertal children could be affected by the ordinary intake of cow milk.”
Reference: “Exposure to exogenous estrogen through intake of commercial milk produced from pregnant cows”, Pediatrics International, 2010 Feb;52(1):33-8; at
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19496976

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Is Milk Responsible for Male Reproductive Disorders?” That’s the title of a report in science journal Medical Hypotheses. The summary states: “The role of environmental compounds with estrogenic activity in the development of male reproductive disorders has been a source of great concern. Among the routes of human exposure to estrogens, we are particularly concerned about cows’ milk, which contains considerable amounts of estrogens. The major sources of animal-derived estrogens in the human diet are milk and dairy products, which account for 60-70% of the estrogens consumed. Humans consume milk obtained from heifers in the latter half of pregnancy, when the estrogen levels in cows are markedly elevated. The milk that we now consume may be quite unlike that consumed 100 years ago. Modern genetically-improved dairy cows, such as the Holstein, are usually fed a combination of grass and concentrates (grain/protein mixes and various by-products), allowing them to lactate during the latter half of pregnancy, even at 220 days of gestation. We hypothesize that milk is responsible, at least in part, for some male reproductive disorders.”
Reference: “Is milk responsible for male reproductive disorders?”, Medical Hypotheses, 2001 Oct;57(4):510-4; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11601881

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A study reported in the Human Reproduction science journal states: “We found that intake of full-fat dairy was inversely related to sperm motility and morphology.” In other words lower sperm quality is associated with higher consumption of saturated animal fats. Specifically they stated: “These associations were driven primarily by intake of cheese and were independent of overall dietary patterns.”
Reference: “Dairy food intake in relation to semen quality and reproductive hormone levels among physically active young men”, Human Reproduction, 2013 Aug;28(8):2265-75; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23670169

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See this link for a page with more reports on how the consumption of saturated animal fats is associated with higher rates of infertility and other reproductive disorders.

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Consuming Dairy Products Increases the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease?

A 2014 report in the American Journal of Epidemiology states: “The authors prospectively investigated the association between dairy intake and risk of Parkinson’s disease among 57,689 men and 73,175 women… Dairy consumption was positively associated with the risk of Parkinson’s disease… The meta-analysis of all prospective studies confirmed a moderately elevated risk of Parkinson’s disease among individuals with high dairy consumption… These data suggest that dairy consumption may increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease, particularly in men…”

Reference: “Dairy products and risk of Parkinson’s disease”, Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1; 165(9): 998–1006. Published online 2007 Jan 31. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwk089
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2232901/

A 2015 article in Time magazine is titled “Drinking Milk Is Linked to Parkinson’s Disease: Study“. Some excerpts: “Studies have found a connection between the consumption of dairy products and a higher risk of developing Parkinson disease, the neurodegenerative disorder that affects motor neurons in the brain. While researchers speculated that chemicals found in cows’ milk might be responsible… Now, scientists may have uncovered a promising clue. Reporting in the journal Neurology… They found that men who reported drinking more than two glasses of milk a day (16 oz) showed the thinnest nerve networks in these areas, suggesting compromised function of these nerves, compared to men who drank little or no milk. The milk drinkers also had residues of specific organochlorines called heptachlor epoxide… Heptachlor epoxide is no longer used as an insecticide in the U.S. According to the Environmental Protection Agency… But it tends to be persistent, remaining in soil and water for many years…”

Reference: http://time.com/4143358/milk-parkinsons-disease-pesticides/

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Regards the High Concentration of Pesticides in Cow’s Milk, Dairy & Meat Products:

A 2011 report in Prevention magazine is titled “The Dirty Dozen – Contaminated Foods.” Some excerpts: “FDA and USDA research shows high levels of pesticide and chemicals in these commonly contaminated foods… The chemical pesticides detected in these studies are known to cause cancer, birth defects, nervous system and brain damage, and developmental problems in children…
1. Beef, Pork and Poultry. The EPA reports that meat is contaminated with higher levels of pesticides than any plant food. Many chemical pesticides are fat-soluble and accumulate in the fatty tissue of animals. Animal feed that contains animal products compounds the accumulation, which is directly passed to the human consumer.
Antibiotics, drugs, and hormones are a standard in animal husbandry, all of which accumulate and are passed on to consumers as well. Ocean fish carry a higher risk for heavy metals than pesticides, though many freshwater fish are exposed to high levels of pesticides from contaminated water.
2. Milk, Cheese and Butter. For reasons similar to those for meat, the fat in dairy products poses a high risk for contamination by pesticides. Animals concentrate pesticides and chemicals in their milk and meat. Growth hormones and antibiotics are also serious concerns and are invariably found in commercial milk, cheese, and butter…”
Reference: http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eating-tips/12-commonly-contaminated-foods

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Regards Other Health Problems, Illness & Disease Conditions Linked to Drinking Cow’s Milk & Consuming Dairy Products:

From the Harvard School of Public Health article titled “Should You Get Calcium from Milk?” – some excerpts: “When most people in the United States think of calcium, they immediately think of milk. But should this be so? Milk is actually only one of many sources of calcium—dark leafy green vegetables and some types of legumes are among the other sources—and there are some important reasons why milk may not be the best source for everyone.
These reasons include the following:
Lactose Intolerance.
Many people have some degree of lactose intolerance. For them, eating or drinking dairy products causes problems like cramping, bloating, gas, and diarrhea. These symptoms can range from mild to severe. Certain groups are much more likely to have lactose intolerance. For example, 90 percent of Asians, 70 percent of blacks and Native Americans, and 50 percent of Hispanics are lactose intolerant, compared to only about 15 percent of people of Northern European descent…
High Saturated Fat Content.
Many dairy products are high in saturated fats, and a high saturated fat intake is a risk factor for heart disease.
And while it’s true that most dairy products are now available in fat-reduced or nonfat options… it’s often the same people who purchase these higher fat products who also purchase the low-fat dairy products, so it’s not clear that they’re making great strides in cutting back on their saturated fat consumption…
Possible Increased Risk of Ovarian Cancer…
A recent pooled analysis of 12 prospective cohort studies, which included more than 500,000 women, found that women with high intakes of lactose—equivalent to that found in 3 cups of milk per day—had a modestly higher risk of ovarian cancer, compared to women with the lowest lactose intakes…
Probable Increased Risk of Prostate Cancer…
In a Harvard study of male health professionals, men who drank two or more glasses of milk a day were almost twice as likely to develop advanced prostate cancer as those who didn’t drink milk at all…
Clearly, although more research is needed, we cannot be confident that high milk or calcium intake is safe.”
Reference: “Calcium: What’s Best for Your Bones and Health?”
http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/calcium-full-story/

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“After 40+ years of medical practice, Dr. Michael Klaper, a leading authority on nutritional medicine, spells out his health concerns about human consumption of dairy products… includes numerous references from scientific studies…. In this free, 42-minute illustrated presentation…” at http://doctorklaper.com/webinars/dairy-doubts

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Science Scientific Medical Health Studies Study Reports Ditch Drinking Dairy Scary Cow's Cow Milk Products Bad Good Wrong Not Healthy Unhealthy Causes More Increases Mortality Prevent Osteoporosis Diseases Illnesses Bones Bone Death Rates Facts

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From “The Milk Letter – A Message to My Patients” by Robert M. Kradjian, MD, Breast Surgery Chief, Division of General Surgery, Seton Medical Centre. Excerpts: “I believe that there are three reliable sources of information. The first, and probably the best, is a study of nature. The second is to study the history of our own species. Finally we need to look at the world’s scientific literature on the subject of milk.
Let’s look at the scientific literature first. From 1988 to 1993 there were over 2,700 articles dealing with milk recorded in the “Medicine” archives. Fifteen hundred of theses had milk as the main focus of the article. There is no lack of scientific information on this subject. I reviewed over 500 of the 1,500 articles, discarding articles that dealt exclusively with animals, esoteric research and inconclusive studies.
How would I summarize the articles? They were only slightly less than horrifying. First of all, none of the authors spoke of cow’s milk as an excellent food, free of side effects and the “perfect food” as we have been led to believe by the industry. The main focus of the published reports seems to be on intestinal colic, intestinal irritation, intestinal bleeding, anemia, allergic reactions in infants and children as well as infections such as salmonella. More ominous is the fear of viral infection with bovine leukemia virus or an AIDS-like virus as well as concern for childhood diabetes. Contamination of milk by blood and white (pus) cells as well as a variety of chemicals and insecticides was also discussed. Among children the problems were allergy, ear and tonsillar infections, bedwetting, asthma, intestinal bleeding, colic and childhood diabetes. In adults the problems seemed centered more around heart disease and arthritis, allergy, sinusitis, and the more serious questions of leukemia, lymphoma and cancer…”
From article at http://www.rense.com/general29/milkt.htm

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Dairy Products associated with Inflammation and Sickness from exposure to Hormones and Antibiotics?

From a 2013 article titled “The Dangers Of Dairy” by Dr. Amy Myers MD, some excerpts: “The truth is, dairy can lead to countless health issues and, for many, can cause more harm than good, here’s why. It’s highly inflammatory.
Dairy is one of the most inflammatory foods in our modern diet, second only to gluten. It causes inflammation in a large percentage of the population, resulting in digestive issues such as bloating, gas, constipation, and diarrhea, as well as other symptoms including acne, and a stronger presentation of autistic behaviors…
It’s often full of hormones and antibiotics:
Many times when people drink milk they’re consuming far more than just milk. American dairy farmers have long been injecting cows with a genetically engineered bovine growth hormone called rBGH to increase milk production. This forced increase in milk production often leads to an udder infection in cows called mastitis, which is then treated with courses of antibiotics, which can make their way into your dairy products…”
– Reference: http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-8646/the-dangers-of-dairy.html

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From a 2012 article titled “Harvard Declares Dairy NOT Part of Healthy Diet” some excerpts: “The Harvard School of Public Health sent a strong message to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and nutrition experts everywhere with the recent release of its “Healthy Eating Plate” food guide. The university was responding to the USDA’s new MyPlate guide for healthy eating, which replaced the outdated and misguided food pyramid.
Harvard’s nutrition experts did not pull punches, declaring that the university’s food guide was based on sound nutrition research and more importantly, not influenced by food industry lobbyists. The greatest evidence of its research focus is the absence of dairy products from the “Healthy Eating Plate” based on Harvard’s assessment that “…high intake [of dairy] can increase the risk of prostate cancer and possibly ovarian cancer.” The Harvard experts also referred to the high levels of saturated fat in most dairy products and suggested that collards, bok choy, fortified soy milk, and baked beans are safer choices than dairy for obtaining calcium, as are high quality supplements…”
Article at https://www.care2.com/greenliving/harvard-declares-dairy-not-part-of-healthy-diet.html with reference to https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-eating-plate/

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Dietary Calcium Does Not Prevent Osteoporosis and Does Not Reduce Risk of Bone Fractures?

The conclusion from a 2015 British Medical Journal (BMJ) study states: “Dietary calcium intake is not associated with risk of fracture, and there is no clinical trial evidence that increasing calcium intake from dietary sources prevents fractures. Evidence that calcium supplements prevent fractures is weak and inconsistent.”
Reference: “Calcium intake and risk of fracture: systematic review”, BMJ 2015; 351:h4580; at http://www.bmj.com/content/351/bmj.h4580

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Another 2015 British Medical Journal (BMJ) report states: “Increasing calcium intake from dietary sources or by taking calcium supplements produces small non-progressive increases in BMD [bone mineral density], which are unlikely to lead to a clinically significant reduction in risk of fracture.”
Reference: “Calcium intake and bone mineral density: systematic review and meta-analysis”, BMJ. 2015 Sep 29;351:h4183; at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26420598

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The Harvard School of Public Health: “studies suggest that high calcium intake doesn’t actually appear to lower a person’s risk for osteoporosis. For example, in the large Harvard studies of male health professionals and female nurses, individuals who drank one glass of milk (or less) per week were at no greater risk of breaking a hip or forearm than were those who drank two or more glasses per week. (2, 3) When researchers combined the data from the Harvard studies with other large prospective studies, they still found no association between calcium intake and fracture risk. (4) Also, the combined results of randomized trials that compared calcium supplements with a placebo showed that calcium supplements did not protect against fractures of the hip or other bones. Moreover, there was some suggestion that calcium supplements taken without vitamin D might even increase the risk of hip fractures. A 2014 study also showed that higher milk consumption during teenage years was not associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in older adults. (27)
Additional evidence further supports the idea that American adults may not need as much calcium as is currently recommended. For example, in countries such as India, Japan, and Peru where average daily calcium intake is as low as 300 milligrams per day (less than a third of the U.S. recommendation for adults, ages 19 to 50), the incidence of bone fractures is quite low. Of course, these countries differ in other important bone-health factors as well—such as level of physical activity and amount of sunlight—which could account for their low fracture rates…”
From an article titled “Calcium: What’s Best for Your Bones and Health?”
http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/calcium-full-story/

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Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: “calcium intake alone does not protect against osteoporosis and fractures, nor do low calcium intakes predict fracture risk. A 1992 review of fracture rates in many different countries showed that populations with the lowest calcium intakes had far fewer fractures than those with much higher intakes. For example, South African blacks had a very low average daily calcium intake—only 196 milligrams—yet their a fracture incidence was only 6.8 per 100,000 person-years, far below that of either black or white Americans, whose incidence rates were 60.4 and 118.3 per 100,000 person-years, respectively.
A possible explanation for this apparent contradiction is that countries with high calcium intakes also tend to have high protein intakes…
The Harvard Nurses’ Health Study of 77,761 women, aged 34 to 59 followed for 12 years, found that those who drank three or more glasses of milk per day had NO reduction in the risk of hip or arm fractures compared to those who drank little or no milk, even after adjustment for weight, menopausal status, smoking, and alcohol use. In fact, the fracture rates were slightly, but significantly, higher for those who consumed this much milk, compared to those who drank little or no milk…”
From an article titled “Preventing and Reversing Osteoporosis”
http://www.pcrm.org/health/health-topics/preventing-and-reversing-osteoporosis

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Dr Michael Greger has provided 21 videos on osteoporosis and nutrition matters at https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/osteoporosis/ The relevant science journal studies are usually shown in each video.

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From an article titled “Understanding the Problems with Dairy Products” by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, some excerpts: “Many Americans, including some vegetarians, still consume large amounts of dairy products. Here are eight great reasons to eliminate dairy products from your diet.

1. Osteoporosis: Milk is touted for preventing osteoporosis, yet clinical research shows otherwise. The Harvard Nurses’ Health Study… showed no protective effect of increased milk consumption on fracture risk. In fact, increased intake of calcium from dairy products was associated with a higher fracture risk…

2. Cardiovascular Disease: Dairy products… contribute significant amounts of cholesterol and fat to the diet. Diets high in fat and saturated fat can increase the risk of several chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease…

3. Cancer: Several cancers, such as ovarian cancer, have been linked to the consumption of dairy products… Breast and prostate cancers have also been linked to consumption of dairy products…

4. Diabetes: Insulin-dependent diabetes (Type I or childhood-onset) is linked to consumption of dairy products…

5. Lactose Intolerance: Lactose intolerance is common among many populations…
6. Vitamin D Toxicity…

7. Contaminants: Synthetic hormones… antibiotics… Pesticides and other drugs are also frequent contaminants of dairy products.

8. Health Concerns of Infants and Children: Milk proteins, milk sugar, fat, and saturated fat in dairy products may pose health risks for children and lead to the development of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and formation of athersclerotic plaques that can lead to heart disease… iron deficiency is more likely on a dairy-rich diet… Colic is an additional concern with milk consumption… A recent study also linked cow’s milk consumption to chronic constipation in children…”

Reference: http://www.nutritionmd.org/nutrition_tips/nutrition_tips_understand_foods/dairy.html

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A 2014 article by Thomas Campbell, MD is titled “12 Frightening Facts About Milk” at http://nutritionstudies.org/12-frightening-facts-milk/

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Why How Who Truth Facts Debate Lies About Drinking Dairy Cow's Milk Products Cheese Calcium Good Bad Not Healthy Unhealthy Healthier Scary Causes Makes Increases More Disease Illness Prevent Osteoporosis Strong Bone Weak Bones Heart Disease Prostate Ovarian Breast Cancer Risks Exposed Science Scientific Health Medical Studies Articles Reports Benefits Acne Constipation Mucus Dangerous Lactose Intolerance Inflammation Growth Hormones Antibiotics

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TED talk “The Magnificent Milk Myth … Debunked” is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGXeX7PPrCI … “Brooke Miles, a former-dairy-fanatic-turned-vegan, is a humorous writer and a sought-after, award-winning speaker… While Brooke doesn’t expect to convert the world to veganism, she aims to educate people on nutritional choices through a light-hearted approach.”

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DAIRY IS SCARY! The industry explained in 5 minutes” is a short clip by Erin Janus on youtube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcN7SGGoCNI

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More to come!

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This set of articles were compiled for
www.EatingOurFuture.com

Pages on this Site:

Eating Meat & Dairy Increases Climate Change, Pollution & Damage to Our Environment

Quotes from news reports & science journals on how the Western omnivore diet with meat and dairy products accelerates climate-change through: i) increasing our carbon footprint of greenhouse gases; ii) deforesting & destroying wilderness that absorbs carbon and protects biodiversity; iii) creating massive pollution; and iv) wasting resources like grains, water, fuels and agricultural lands.

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Eating Meat linked to Higher Rates & Risk of Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Disease & Early Death

Excerpts & links to medical studies, articles & reports on the links between meat consumption and increased incidences of cancer, heart disease, diabetes and early mortality (a shorter lifespan); also to reports on how cancers are increasing in young people.

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Scientific Studies on Health Advantages of Vegans & Vegetarians

Quotes & links to articles in science, medical & health journals that report great benefits vegetarians and vegans generally have including longer lives with less of the chronic degenerative diseases like cancer, cardiovascular heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and obesity as well as lower blood pressure, hypertension and blood cholesterol levels.

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Mass Extinction Loss of Biodiversity caused by Humans

Excerpts & links to articles in news media  science journals about the current ‘Sixth Mass Extinction’ known also as the ‘Holocene Extinction’ or ‘Anthropocene Extinction’ as it is largely caused by human activities.

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Dairy Milk Health Problems – Issues & Risks for Related Disease & Illness

This page contains quotes & links for studies & articles in science journals, news media & by medical doctors; on the association of drinking milk to higher rates of osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease and other illnesses.

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Risk of Infectious Disease Epidemics from Antibiotic-resistant Bacteria due to Animal Agriculture

This page features quotes & links to articles in news media and science journals about the rise of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics; posing a grave threat to all of us; from 50% to 80% of antibiotics are (mis-)used in animal agriculture industries.

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How the Meat & Dairy Industry Influences Politics, Government, Education, News & Media

This page features quotes & links to reports that expose how the animal agriculture industries (meat, dairy, poultry) influence government, politics, the education schooling system and news media in order to promote their interests.

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Eating Seafood & Overfishing is Destroying Oceans, Rivers & Wildlife

Excerpts from articles about the marine ecosystem collapse that is happening now in oceans, seas & rivers due to over-fishing and the toxic pollution in waterways from land-based animal agriculture meat-farming; worsening climate change; threatening the entire food chain.

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Studies Find Eating Fish Seafood Not So Healthy With Raised Risks of Disease

Articles from science journals & news reports that dispute the health claims made regards eating fish; some even find higher rates of heart disease and cancer among seafood consumers.

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Are Soy Foods Healthy or Not? Doctors & Nutrition Experts Refute Some Myths

A collection of quotes & links for articles by doctors, dietitians & nutrition experts who refute & rebut the negative claims made regards “the soy food debate”

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For Archives of Related Memes see:

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How We Are Eating Our Future

This site’s original 2012 page with excerpts from articles in science journals and news media about how what we choose to eat can: i) accelerate or slow down climate change and the related environmental catastrophes we face; and ii) increase or reduce our risks for chronic illness and disease. The evidence and body of opinion against the animal agriculture livestock industry is particularly compelling and damning.

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